Question: Can A 9 Year Old Decide Which Parent To Live With?

Can you choose which parent to live with at 15?

By 15 or 16 if the child is of general maturity and has logical reasons for changing the custody, the court will often abide by the child’s wishes.

The key is that the child has to have a logical reason for changing the present support and placement..

Can a minor choose where they want to live?

Parents often want to know at what age a child can decide whom to live with. The answer is simply: according to the law, eighteen. However, dissolution of marriage statutes provide that the child’s wish as to where s/he will live is a factor to be considered by a court in making a custody decision.

How do you decide which parent you want to live with?

A judge may ask a child who is old enough (typically 12 to 14) which parent he or she prefers to live with the majority of the time. A judge will typically do this outside of the courtroom, to keep the child out of the case as much as possible. A judge will use a third-party evaluator to ascertain the child’s wishes.

Can a 12 year old choose to live with a grandparent?

If the child is at least 12 years old, he or she may choose who takes custody. Conditions for grandparent visitation rights include determination of whether one of the child’s parents is deceased, or a parent has had his or her parental rights terminated.

Can a 13 year old decide who they want to live with?

A child does not get to dictate who they live with or the terms of visitation until they are of the age of majority. Their wishes are a factor that a court will consider, and the older they are the more likely a court will consider the wishes.

Do I have the right to know who my child is around?

Each parent is entitled to know where the children are during visitations. They should also know if the children are left with other people such as babysitters or friends when the other parent is not there. … Both parents should realize that visitation schedules may change as children age and their needs change.

Is Arkansas a mother State?

The questions in the next section are some issues that the court uses to help determine what is in the best interests of the child. Arkansas law considers both parents equally when deciding who will get custody. The judge cannot favor the mother for custody just because she is the mother.

Can a child choose not to live with a parent?

There is no fixed age when a child can decide on where they should live in a parenting dispute. … The Court will be reluctant to separate siblings who are usually strongly attached to one another, however the Court will rarely seek to force a mature and insightful child to spend time with a parent they refuse to see.

What happens when a child doesn’t want to visit the other parent?

In cases where parents can’t agree, a judge will decide visitation and custody based on the child’s best interests. … Both parents are bound by the terms of a custody order. If your child refuses to go to visits with the other parent, you could still be on the hook for failing to comply with a custody order.

Do you have to pay child support if you have joint custody in Arkansas?

The guidelines state that joint physical custody will not necessarily mean equal amounts of time between parents. In Arkansas, the child support formula is the same for sole and joint physical custody. Unlike many other states, Arkansas gives no automatic parenting time credit that can reduce your child support amount.

What age can a child decide they don’t want to see a parent?

Court Orders Once a child reaches the age of 16, he/she is legally allowed to choose which parent to live with. The only reason this wouldn’t apply is if there’s a Court Order stating that a child must remain with a certain parent until a certain time.

Can 12 year old decide parent they want live?

Under the old law, a child age 12 or older could file with the court, the name of the parent who the child wants (or chooses) to decide where the child should live. … It simply meant the child was stating his or her preference, and from there, the court would be the ultimate decision maker.

At what age in Arkansas can a child decide which parent to live with?

18 yearsIn Arkansas, there is no specific age when a child can decide who he or she wants to live with. The court has the final say until the child turns 18 years of age. In most cases, the circumstances of the situation will matter as much or more than the child’s age.

Does a 13 year old have a say in custody?

The mere age of your child will not determine your family law matter. … In other word’s, the child’s reasons for their decision were not deemed mature and appropriate. In other circumstances a 13 or 14 year old’s wishes may be given significant weight if they are expressed in a well thought out and mature manner.

What do you do when your child doesn’t want to see the dad?

Talk to your child about why they don’t want to go Try to get to the bottom of why your child doesn’t want to spend time or stay with your co-parent. Let your child express their feelings to you without judgment. When it’s your turn to respond, do so with kindness and understanding.

Can my 15 year old refuse visitation?

Most judges understand that once a child reaches their teens (14 /15 /16 /17), it certainly is difficult to force them to visit with a noncustodial parent when they are adamant about not seeing them, but it truly is not the child’s decision.

Can a child refuse visitation in Arkansas?

Can My Child Refuse to Visit? In most cases, no. There is no specific age in Arkansas when a child can refuse to visit with a non-custodial parent. However, Arkansas law does permit the court to consider the child’s opinion on visitation if the child is of sufficient age and capacity to reason, regardless of age.

Can a child become emancipated from one parent?

A minor generally cannot become emancipated from just one parent unless there is only one parent, such as when one of the minor’s parents has died, or has terminated their parental rights. Emancipation of a minor terminates all parental custodial rights, which in turn makes that minor an adult for legal purposes.